Buffalo Trace Distillery - The Complete Nearly 250 Year Timeline

About two decades before George Washington, the nations first President, started his distillery at Mt. Vernon, hardy pioneers, surveyors, and explorers were making their way through the buffalo trace crossings along the Kentucke (original spelling used on early maps) River near Lees-town in 1773. Two years later, Lees-town or Leestown was surveyed and literally put on the map. We know this town today by the name Frankfort, the capital of Kentucky and home to Buffalo Trace Distillery, maker of its namesake brand Buffalo Trace as well as E.H. Taylor, Jr., George T. Stagg, Albert B. Blanton, Elmer T. Lee, Pappy Van Winkle, and W.L. Weller bourbon and rye whiskeys.

The first commercial distillery on this site dates back to 1858. Just over a decade later that distillery was acquired by Col. Edward Haynes ‘E.H.’ Taylor, Jr., a man often referred to as the ‘Father of the Modern Bourbon Industry.’ And as they say, the rest is history, in this case, Bourbon History.

Through the challenges of floods, lightning strikes, fires, World Wars, tornadoes, Prohibition, and a major downturn in brown spirits, the distillery known today as Buffalo Trace Distillery has survived and thrived.

We’ve distilled the two and a half centuries since its beginning into this condensed timeline to give you an idea how Buffalo Trace Distillery got where it is today. Enjoy!

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The Buffalo Trace Distillery Timeline

Kentucky Historical Marker - Leestown, In 1773 McAfee Company and Hancock Taylor came here, Front
1773 Leestown Land Survey
Leestown Surveying Begins
Historical Marker: In 1773 McAfee Company and Hancock Taylor came here and surveyed area, an early pioneer stopping place. By 1775 Leestown settled and named by Hancock and Willis Lee; established by Va. Assembly, 1776. Temporarily abandoned in 1777 because of Indian attack, it was reestablished and became well-known shipping port for tobacco, hemp, corn and whiskey to New Orleans market. Leestown, also spelled Lee's Town, later became part of Frankfort. (front)
1773 Leestown Land Survey
Kentucky Historical Marker - Leestown, In 1773 McAfee Company and Hancock Taylor came here, Front
Kentucky Historical Marker - Leestown, Va. General Assembly had tobacco inspection warehouse, Back
Leestown: Va. General Assembly had tobacco inspection warehouse erected in Leestown, 1783. A hemp factory was here for many years. At one time Leestown was a commercial center and contender for the state capital. During the War of 1812 it served as supply base against Indians. In 1827 the stones for the Old State House were quarried from riverbank near here. (back)
Kentucky Historical Marker - Leestown, Va. General Assembly had tobacco inspection warehouse, Back
1784 Lee's Town - First Time on a Map, By John Filson, Lee's-town and Lexington Highlights
1784 Lee's-town, Kentucke
Lee's-town Appears on Map
This map of Kentucke, drawn from actual observations, is inscribed with the most perfect respect, to the Honorable the Congress of the United States of America, and to his excellency George Washington late Commander in Chief of their Army. By their humble servant, John Filson.
1784 Lee's-town, Kentucke
1784 Lee's Town - First Time on a Map, By John Filson, Lee's-town and Lexington Highlights
Kentucky Map - A Map of Kentucky from Actual Survey by Elihu Barker c1793
1792 Kentucky Becomes a State
Kentucky is the 15th State
Kentucky was admitted to the Union on June 1, 1792, becoming the 15th state of the United States.
1792 Kentucky Becomes a State
Kentucky Map - A Map of Kentucky from Actual Survey by Elihu Barker c1793
Buffalo Trace Distillery - View of the O.F.C. Distillery from Kentucky River Lock 4
1858 First Commercial Distillery
Swigert Distillery
In 1857 Jacob Swigert’s son Daniel acquired the [Leestown, 4 acre] property and by the end of the following year he had converted it [presumably a pork processing plant] into a distillery. Historian D. G. Churchill has described it as a "new type of whiskey making facility, designed for volume output, more efficient production, and ease of marketing" and a "prototype of the full-time, large-scale industrial distillery which would dominate the field in the post-Civil War era. Photo: Brown-Swigert-Taylor-Bradley House c1815: Once owned by Jacob Swigert then later sold to E.H. Taylor who then occupied the home until about 1874.
1858 First Commercial Distillery
Buffalo Trace Distillery - View of the O.F.C. Distillery from Kentucky River Lock 4
O.F.C Distillery - Below Lock IV on Kentucky River
1859 Swigert Distillery Sold (Twice)
Swigert Distillery For Sale
Swigert had barely equipped his distillery when he offered it for sale, explaining to prospective buyers that other business commitments prompted him to sell. Historian D.G. Churchill has suggested another reason: bourbon making was not yet the profitable enterprise it would become after the war. The tame antebellum bourbon market may explain in part why Swigert could not find a purchaser until December 1859 when Clement and Ashton Craig bought the distillery, spring, "stone dwelling" (Riverside), and stables for $3,500. By the late 1860s the distillery had passed again to S.J.M. Major, Richard Tobin, and James Graham.
1859 Swigert Distillery Sold (Twice)
O.F.C Distillery - Below Lock IV on Kentucky River
Kentucky Historical Marker - O.F.C. Stagg Distillery, Purchased by Schenley Distiller in 1929, Purchased by Sazerac in 1992, Front
1869-1870 O.F.C. Distillery
O.F.C Distillery / George T. Stagg Distillery
Historical Marker: E. H. Taylor, Jr., important figure in distilling industry, established the O.F.C. Distillery in 1869-70. Purchased by Geo. Stagg in 1878 and, in 1904, renamed George T. Stagg Distillery. During prohibition, one of few distilleries in the U.S. granted federal permit to bottle medicinal whiskey, allowing it to remain open. Albert Blanton became president in 1921.
1869-1870 O.F.C. Distillery
Kentucky Historical Marker - O.F.C. Stagg Distillery, Purchased by Schenley Distiller in 1929, Purchased by Sazerac in 1992, Front
O.F.C. Distillery - Colonel E.H. Taylor Jr.
Col. E.H. Taylor, Jr.
The Father of Modern Bourbon Industry
Col. E.H. Taylor, Jr. was a visionary in the whiskey world with a mind for distilling that was years ahead of its time. He founded several distilleries including the O.F.C. Distillery, made advancements to the industry, and fought for the purity and legitimacy of bourbon through his support of the Bottled-in-Bond Act of 1897. He is often referred to as the “Father of the Modern Bourbon Industry.” Taylor was born February 12, 1830 in Columbus, Kentucky. He died at the age of 92 on January 19, 1923 in Frankfort, Kentucky.
Col. E.H. Taylor, Jr.
O.F.C. Distillery - Colonel E.H. Taylor Jr.
O.F.C. Distillery - The Original Distillery in 1869
1870 O.F.C. Distillery
The Original O.F.C. Distillery
In 1869 Col. Edmund Haynes Taylor, Jr. purchases the distillery and renames it the O.F.C. (Old Fire Copper) Distillery in Frankfort, Kentucky.
1870 O.F.C. Distillery
O.F.C. Distillery - The Original Distillery in 1869
O.F.C. Distillery - The Second Distillery, Built 1873, Destroyed by Fire June 1882
1873 O.F.C. Distillery
The Second O.F.C. Distillery
Col. E.H. Taylor, Jr. invests $70,000 to build a new more modern distillery in 1873. This distillery was later destroyed by a lightning strike and subsequent fire that destroyed the distillery in the summer of 1882.
1873 O.F.C. Distillery
O.F.C. Distillery - The Second Distillery, Built 1873, Destroyed by Fire June 1882
O.F.C. Distillery - George T. Stagg
1878 George T. Stagg Acquires O.F.C.
Taylor Declares Bankruptcy – George T. Stagg Acquires O.F.C Distillery
As early as 1871 E.H. Taylor, Jr. was in trouble, and in 1877 he declared bankruptcy. In 1878 George T. Stagg and an associate acquired the O.F.C. Distillery and another Taylor distillery in neighboring Woodford County. The following year Stagg and Taylor formed the E. H. Taylor, Jr. Company and Taylor was assigned the daily operation of the distilleries. Taylor became dissatisfied with the arrangement, however, and in 1886-87 he and Stagg dissociated. Stagg was born December 19, 1835, in Garrard County, Kentucky. He retired in the early 1890s and passed away at the young age of 58 on Wednesday May 24, 1893.
1878 George T. Stagg Acquires O.F.C.
O.F.C. Distillery - George T. Stagg
O.F.C. Distillery - Col. E.H. Taylor Built the Carlisle Distillery next to the OFC Distillery in 1879
1879/1880 The Carlisle Distillery
The Carlisle Distillery is Built Next to the O.F.C. Distillery
In 1879-80 Taylor and his associates built a second facility at this location, the Carlisle Distillery, named for U.S. Congressman and bourbon industry backer John G. Carlisle. The Carlisle Distillery was renamed the Kentucky River Distillery in 1898.
1879/1880 The Carlisle Distillery
O.F.C. Distillery - Col. E.H. Taylor Built the Carlisle Distillery next to the OFC Distillery in 1879
O.F.C. Distillery - The Third Distillery, Built 1883
1883 O.F.C. Distillery
The Third O.F.C. Distillery
The 1873 distillery was destroyed by a fire in 1882. A new distillery was built in 1883 at a cost of $44,000 over and above the insurance collected. This distillery still stands today. During a 2016 renovation, nicknamed Bourbon Pompeii, the original O.F.C. foundation, malting floor, and fermentation tanks were unearthed and are now open for tours.
1883 O.F.C. Distillery
O.F.C. Distillery - The Third Distillery, Built 1883
O.F.C. Distillery - Burned to the Ground, The Memphis Daily Appeal Friday, June 16, 1882
Distillery Burns to Ground from Lighting Strike
At about 3:30pm on June 15, 1882 during one of the hardest thunder-storms that ever visited this vicinity, lightning struck the O.F.C. Distillery, catching on fire and it was totally destroyed. Source: The Memphis Daily Appeal, Friday, June 16, 1882.
O.F.C. Distillery - Burned to the Ground, The Memphis Daily Appeal Friday, June 16, 1882
O.F.C. Distillery - O.F.C. 113 Warehouse C, Built 1885
1885 Warehouse C (Steam Heat)
O.F.C. Distillery Warehouse C
Built in 1885, this warehouse is a fine example of "Rick Construction". The basic structure is built of massive wooden beams which bear the entire weight of the 24,000 barrels residing herein. The foundation consists of Kentucky River Marble, quarried from the Kentucky River a short distance away. The 18-inch-thick brick walls allow warehousemen to control the temperature within. The shuttered windows are open in the Summer and closed in the Winter so the perfect temperature balance is maintained and the barrels are allowed to age year-round. In 1886 a steam heating system is installed, making this the first distillery to use steam heat which is still in use today.
1885 Warehouse C (Steam Heat)
O.F.C. Distillery - O.F.C. 113 Warehouse C, Built 1885
O.F.C. Distillery - Colonel Albert Bacon Blanton
1897 Albert B. Blanton Joins Company
Albert Blanton Joins the Company at 16 Years of Age
In 1897 Albert Bacon Blanton joined what was then the George T. Stagg Distillery as an office boy at the age of 16. Over the next several years, Blanton was promoted and given experience in every department at the distillery and In 1921, Col. Blanton was promoted to president of the distillery. Blanton was born February 28, 1881, on a farm outside of Frankfort, Kentucky. He passed away at the age of 78 on May 21, 1959.
1897 Albert B. Blanton Joins Company
O.F.C. Distillery - Colonel Albert Bacon Blanton
George T. Stagg Distillery - Office of Col. E.H. Taylor and George T. Stagg
1904 George T. Stagg Distillery
The Distillery was Rechristened the George T. Stagg Distillery
The O.F.C. Distillery was renamed as the George T. Stagg Distillery in 1904, just over 10 years after Stagg's death.
1904 George T. Stagg Distillery
George T. Stagg Distillery - Office of Col. E.H. Taylor and George T. Stagg
100 Years Ago Today - Nation Votes Itself Dry, January 16, 1919
18th Amendment – Prohibition
The U.S. Votes Itself Dry
On January 16, 1919 the United States of America voted itself dry. With a three-forth majority vote, the state of Nebraska became the 36th state to ratify the 18th Amendment making Prohibition the law of the land effective one year from this date. One year later, the Volstead Act made it official.
18th Amendment – Prohibition
100 Years Ago Today - Nation Votes Itself Dry, January 16, 1919
O.F.C. Distillery - OFC Whiskey, Bottled-in-Bond, Full Pint, 100 Proof, For Medicinal Use
1919 Prohibition and Medicinal Whiskey
George T. Stagg Distillery was 1 of 6 Allowed to Dispense Medicinal Whiskey
Six distilleries received the right to supply Medicinal Whiskey during Prohibition. This allowed them to store and distribute what had already been made but it did not allow them to distill new whiskey. The six companies were A. Ph. Stitzel Distillery, American Medicinal Spirits, Brown-Forman, Frankfort Distilleries (Four Roses), Glenmore Distillery, and Schenley Distillers.
1919 Prohibition and Medicinal Whiskey
O.F.C. Distillery - OFC Whiskey, Bottled-in-Bond, Full Pint, 100 Proof, For Medicinal Use
Kentucky Historical Marker - O.F.C. Stagg Distillery, Purchased by Schenley Distiller in 1929, Purchased by Sazerac in 1992, Back
1929 Schenley Distillers Buys the Distillery
Schenley Distillers buys the George T. Stagg Distillery
Beginning in the mid-1920s Lewis S. Rosenstiel who had risen to prominence in the medicinal whiskey trade turned his attention to acquiring brands and distilleries, one of them being the Joseph S. Finch Distillery in Schenley, Pa. He also acquired the George T. Stagg Distillery in 1929, and the following year he received permits to produce new make medicinal whiskey at both the Finch and Stagg distilleries. Schenley (as Rosenstiel’s company is generally known) increased production at Stagg in 1931. Historical Marker: Purchased by Schenley Distillers Corp. in 1929, it was greatly expanded and modernized in the 1930s. Sold again in 1992, it was renamed Buffalo Trace Distillery in 1999. Designated a National Historic Landmark in 2013 as an exceptional distillery complex that contains a unique collection of historic buildings and structures.
1929 Schenley Distillers Buys the Distillery
Kentucky Historical Marker - O.F.C. Stagg Distillery, Purchased by Schenley Distiller in 1929, Purchased by Sazerac in 1992, Back
Midway Distilling Co. - Prohibition Era Prescription for Medicinal Liquor
1929 Distillers Holiday
A limited number of distilleries were restarted to produce whiskey during Prohibition.
As supplies of whiskey started to run dry the government granted medicinal makers a short reprieve. On December 7, 1929, the government declared a Distiller’s Holiday that allowed distilleries to fire up their stills for 100 days to make more medicine. Thankfully, four years later on December 5, 1933 the 21st Amendment ended the failed experiment and Prohibition was repealed and distilleries were back in business.
1929 Distillers Holiday
Midway Distilling Co. - Prohibition Era Prescription for Medicinal Liquor
New York Times - Prohibition Repeal Ratified at 5.32pm, Roosevelt Asks Nation to Bar the Saloon, Dec 6, 1933
1933 Prohibition Repealed
On December 5, 1933 Prohibition was Repealed
On December 5, 1933 the 21st Amendment ended the failed experiment and Prohibition was repealed and distilleries were soon back in business.
1933 Prohibition Repealed
New York Times - Prohibition Repeal Ratified at 5.32pm, Roosevelt Asks Nation to Bar the Saloon, Dec 6, 1933
Buffalo Trace Distillery - The Original Drawing for the George T. Stagg Distilling Co. Water Tower, May 11, 1935
1935 Schenley Builds a Water Tower
The George T. Stagg Water Tower
The original drawing from Chicago Bridge & Iron Works company for the George T. Stagg Distilling Co. water tower from May 11, 1935.
1935 Schenley Builds a Water Tower
Buffalo Trace Distillery - The Original Drawing for the George T. Stagg Distilling Co. Water Tower, May 11, 1935
Buffalo Trace Distillery - Water Tower, Frankfort, Kentucky
The Iconic Buffalo Trace Distillery Water Tower
Today, the iconic Buffalo Trace Distillery water can be seen from miles around. The 150,000 gallon water tower stands more than 163' tall and nearly 29 feet wide.
Buffalo Trace Distillery - Water Tower, Frankfort, Kentucky
Buffalo Trace Distillery - 1 Millionth Barrel, July 2 1942
1942 – 1 Millionth Barrel
Ancient Age Distilling Co.
1 millionth barrel since Prohibition was filled on July 2, 1942. In 1969 the distillery was renamed Ancient Age Distilling Company after a Schenley bourbon introduced in 1939 and heavily advertised in the 1950s.
1942 – 1 Millionth Barrel
Buffalo Trace Distillery - 1 Millionth Barrel, July 2 1942
Buffalo Trace Distillery - Master Distiller Elmer T. Lee
1949 Master Distiller Elmer T. Lee
“Son, we’re not hiring any hands today.”
Those were the words that greeted Elmer T. Lee when he first showed up to interview at the distillery in 1949. They happened to be uttered by Col. Albert B. Blanton, the iconic President of the Distillery at the time. Had it not been for Orville Schupp’s insistence that he come in to work the following week anyway, Elmer might not have gone on to be named the Distillery’s first Master Distiller. At a time when bourbon had fallen out of favor for clear spirits, Lee is credited with reviving the industry by launching the world’s first single-barrel bourbon. That bourbon was Blanton’s Single Barrel, named after the man who was initially so skeptical of him. Lee retired in 1985 and was later honored with a bourbon with his name on it. Elmer T. Lee was born August 5, 1919, and passed away at the age of 93 on July 16, 2013.
1949 Master Distiller Elmer T. Lee
Buffalo Trace Distillery - Master Distiller Elmer T. Lee
Buffalo Trace Distillery - 2 Millionth Barrel, June 20, 1953
1953 – 2 Millionth Barrel
George T. Stagg Bourbon
11 years later on June 20, 1953 the 2 millionth barrel was filled.
1953 – 2 Millionth Barrel
Buffalo Trace Distillery - 2 Millionth Barrel, June 20, 1953
George T. Stagg Distillery - Warehouse V is the World's Only One-Barrel Bonded Whiskey Warehouse, Built in 1953
1953 Warehouse V
Warehouse V to Hold Each Millionth Barrel
To celebrate the 2 millionth barrel the distillery built Warehouse V, the world's smallest bonded warehouse, to hold each millionth barrel.
1953 Warehouse V
George T. Stagg Distillery - Warehouse V is the World's Only One-Barrel Bonded Whiskey Warehouse, Built in 1953
Buffalo Trace Distillery - 3 Millionth Barrel, May 29, 1961
1961 – 3 Millionth Barrel
Ancient Age Distilling Company
8 years later on May 29, 1961 the 3 millionth barrel was filled.
1961 – 3 Millionth Barrel
Buffalo Trace Distillery - 3 Millionth Barrel, May 29, 1961
Buffalo Trace Distillery - 4 Millionth Barrel, October 21, 1971
1971 – 4 Millionth Barrel
Ancient Age Distilling Company
10 years later on October 21, 1971 the 4 millionth barrel was filled.
1971 – 4 Millionth Barrel
Buffalo Trace Distillery - 4 Millionth Barrel, October 21, 1971
Buffalo Trace Distillery - 5 Millionth Barrel, March 4, 1981
1981 – 5 Millionth Barrel
Ancient Age Distilling Company
10 years later on March 4, 1981 the 5 millionth barrel was filled.
1981 – 5 Millionth Barrel
Buffalo Trace Distillery - 5 Millionth Barrel, March 4, 1981
Buffalo Trace Distillery - Blantons Bottle
1982 Schenley Sells the Distillery
Ancient Age Distilling Co. Sells to a NY Company
Schenley sold the distillery to a New York company in 1982 that introduced the successful brand Blanton's Single Barrel Bourbon in 1984, first commercially marketed single-barrel bourbon in the nation. The new owners cut employment until in 1991 the work force stood at fifty employees, and the distillery was near closing.
1982 Schenley Sells the Distillery
Buffalo Trace Distillery - Blantons Bottle
Sazerac Company - Since 1850
1992 Sazerac Buys the Distillery
Ancient Age Distilling Co. Acquired by the Goldring Family
In 1992 the distillery was acquired by the William ‘Bill’ Goldring family and the Sazerac Company.
1992 Sazerac Buys the Distillery
Sazerac Company - Since 1850
Buffalo Trace Distillery - 113 Great Buffalo Trace, Frankfort, KY 40601
1999 Sazerac Rechristens the distillery 'Buffalo Trace Distillery'
Introducing Buffalo Trace Distillery
In 1999, after a seven year renovation campaign had been completed the facility was rechristened Buffalo Trace Distillery and distillery's new flagship brand - Buffalo Trace - is launched.
1999 Sazerac Rechristens the distillery 'Buffalo Trace Distillery'
Buffalo Trace Distillery - 113 Great Buffalo Trace, Frankfort, KY 40601
Buffalo Trace Distillery - Mantel Painting of Buffalo Crossing the Kentucky River
Why 'Buffalo Trace Distillery'
How Did Buffalo Trace Distillery Get its Name?
The original Leestown area along the Kentucky River was known to have been a buffalo river crossing area. The Buffalo Trace was described as being a hundred feet wide and the dust several inches deep; in some places the hoofs of the buffaloes had worn the ground down several feet; this Trace was made by vast herds of buffaloes traveling to and from the bluegrass fields in search of salt.
Why 'Buffalo Trace Distillery'
Buffalo Trace Distillery - Mantel Painting of Buffalo Crossing the Kentucky River
Buffalo Trace Distillery - Master Distiller Harlen Wheatley
2005 Master Distiller Harlen Wheatley
Harlen Wheatley is Buffalo Trace’s 6th Master Distiller
Wheatley joined the distillery as a supervisor in 1995. Not long after, the distillery was rechristened and the flagship Buffalo Trace Bourbon was introduced. Wheatley was promoted to Distillery Manager in 2000 and Master Distiller in 2005, becoming Buffalo Trace's sixth Master Distiller since the Civil War. He's been overseeing the companies $1.2 billion expansion for the past several years.
2005 Master Distiller Harlen Wheatley
Buffalo Trace Distillery - Master Distiller Harlen Wheatley
Buffalo Trace Distillery - O.F.C. Warehouse C after April 6, 2006 Tornado
2006 Tornado Rips Roof Off 'Warehouse C'
Tornado Leads to Tornado Surviving Bourbon
On Sunday evening, April 2, 2006, a severe storm with tornado strength winds tore through Central Kentucky, damaging two Buffalo Trace Distillery aging warehouses. One of the damaged warehouses was Warehouse C, a treasured warehouse on property, built by Colonel Edmund Haynes Taylor, Jr. in 1885. It sustained significant damage to its roof and north brick wall, exposing a group of aging bourbon barrels to the elements. That summer, the exposed barrels waited patiently while the roof and walls were repaired, meanwhile being exposed to the Kentucky climate. When these barrels were tasted years later, it was discovered that the sun, wind, and elements they had experienced created a bourbon rich in flavors that was unmatched. The marketing team got involved and before long ‘Warehouse C Tornado Surviving’ bourbon was birthed.
2006 Tornado Rips Roof Off 'Warehouse C'
Buffalo Trace Distillery - O.F.C. Warehouse C after April 6, 2006 Tornado
Buffalo Trace Distillery - 6 Millionth Barrel, May 14, 2008
2008 – 6 Millionth Barrel
Buffalo Trace Distillery
27 years later on May 14, 2008 the 6 millionth barrel was filled.
2008 – 6 Millionth Barrel
Buffalo Trace Distillery - 6 Millionth Barrel, May 14, 2008
Buffalo Trace Distillery - Water Tower and National Historic Site Banner
2013 National Historic Landmark
Buffalo Trace Distillery Designated National Historic Landmark
After 240 years, Buffalo Trace Distillery was named a National Historic Landmark by the United States Department of the Interior. Joining the elite ranks of such American icons as the Alamo, the Empire State Building, and the White House, Buffalo Trace Distillery is now one of only 2,577 National Historic Landmarks in the United States, which represent 0.001% of properties in the U.S.
2013 National Historic Landmark
Buffalo Trace Distillery - Water Tower and National Historic Site Banner
Buffalo Trace Distillery - Historic OFC Distillery Fermenation Tank Discovered, Renovated and in Use, Full Fermenter in Production
2016 The Discovery of 'Bourbon Pompeii'
The Original O.F.C. Distillery Discovered
Distilleries are businesses. As businesses expand and contract, they make changes to their buildings, land, and operations. In some cases, they will bulldoze old buildings to make way for the newer, larger more efficient facilities. While excavating for a new event space the contractors discovered the footings and fermentation tanks from the original 1800s O.F.C. Distillery. One of the fermentation tanks has since been re-lined with brand new copper, brought back online and is once again making bourbon the way it was done in Taylors day. This space is now open for tours.
2016 The Discovery of 'Bourbon Pompeii'
Buffalo Trace Distillery - Historic OFC Distillery Fermenation Tank Discovered, Renovated and in Use, Full Fermenter in Production
Buffalo Trace Distillery - 7 Millionth Barrel
2018 – 7 Millionth Barrel
Buffalo Trace Distillery
10 Years later on April 11, 2018 the 7 millionth barrel was filled.
2018 – 7 Millionth Barrel
Buffalo Trace Distillery - 7 Millionth Barrel
Buffalo Trace Distillery - 58,800 Barrel Warehouse
2018 1st New Rickhouse Since 50s
Buffalo Trace Distillery Completes 1st New Warehouse Since 1950s
Starting in the spring of 2018, Buffalo Trace began filling its first new 58,800 barrel warehouse located on the adjacent 292-acre farm purchased several years ago. They will continue to add warehouses of the same size at a rate of one new warehouse every four months, until further notice. The new warehouses are seven stories tall, metal clad with insulation. The floors are wooden. Buffalo Trace heats its warehouses, starting with the steam heat Col., E.H. Taylor, Jr. brought to the warehouses he built in the late 1800s (See Warehouse C story above). The heating system for the new warehouses on the farm is a patented heating system in the floors with dual zones so temperatures in each warehouse can be managed independently.
2018 1st New Rickhouse Since 50s
Buffalo Trace Distillery - 58,800 Barrel Warehouse
Buffalo Trace Distillery - KY Gov. Beshear, Osiris Johnson, Freddie Johnson, Damon Thayer, Mark Brown, Harlen Wheatley
2022 – 8 Millionth Barrel
Buffalo Trace Distillery
4 years later, on November 29, 2022 the 8 millionth barrel was filled.
2022 – 8 Millionth Barrel
Buffalo Trace Distillery - KY Gov. Beshear, Osiris Johnson, Freddie Johnson, Damon Thayer, Mark Brown, Harlen Wheatley

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Buffalo Trace Distillery is an American family-owned company based in Frankfort, Franklin County, Kentucky. The Distillery’s rich tradition dates back to 1775 and includes such legends as E.H. Taylor, Jr., George T. Stagg, Albert B. Blanton, Orville Schupp, and Elmer T. Lee. Buffalo Trace Distillery is a fully operational distillery producing bourbon, rye, and vodka on site. It is a National Historic Landmark and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

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